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Gun Safety Groups Advocate For More Legislation At Armonk Meeting

Organizers of Wednesday's event about kids and gun safety in Armonk said parents should ask other parents if they have a gun in the house.
Organizers of Wednesday's event about kids and gun safety in Armonk said parents should ask other parents if they have a gun in the house. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Diane Karsch
Justin Wagner, vice president of New Yorker's Against Gun Violence, said a bill that would require parents to lock up their guns is common sense legislation.
Justin Wagner, vice president of New Yorker's Against Gun Violence, said a bill that would require parents to lock up their guns is common sense legislation. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Diane Karsch

ARMONK, N.Y. -- Groups pushing for more gun safety legislation in New York held a special meeting in Armonk on Wednesday, May 14.

New Yorkers Against Gun Violence along with the Million Mom March and Moms Demand Action For Gun Sense in America hosted "Kids and Gun Safety"  at the North Castle Library.

The event featured state Assemblyman David Buchwald and U.S. Rep. Nita Lowey advocating for more gun-safety laws.

The gun safety groups have been advocating the passage of Nicholas' Bill, a law that would require the safe storage of weapons where children may be present. The law was named after a 12-year-old boy from Saratoga Springs, N.Y., who was shot and killed by a friend playing with his father's unlocked and loaded gun. This type of law is already on the books in Westchester.

Justin Wagner, vice president of New Yorkers Against Gun Violence said Nicholas' Law should be a top priority.

"This is a common sense piece of legislation," Wagner said. "It would ensure safe storage of all guns. Ninety-nine percent of people already do this. This is not an anti-2nd amendment issue."

Wagner said states like Mississippi, Texas and Utah already have this legislation.

"New York is behind Mississippi, Texas and Utah," Wagner said. "We have to fix this. Almost 3,000 children are killed each year by guns. Each one of those is a story."

Dr. Arthur Caplan, a bioethicist, said the health toll of guns needs to be looked at more and doctors should discuss guns with their patients.

"Gun violence is the leading cause of death among young people," Caplan said. "Yet lobby groups try to obscure the cost of gun violence. It has a bigger footprint than just dead bodies."

Parents said when they send their kids to someone's house, they should ask if the parent has a gun in the house and if it's secure.

"It's like asking someone how secure their pool is or warning them about a child's allergies," Gina Dashbach said. "You can always ask to have the child to come to your house."

Alex Dubroff said it is an important question for parents to ask other parents about.

"It can be awkward at first, but it's made me feel so much more comfortable," Dubroff said.